Facebook has come under fire after they banned this woman’s makeup free selfie.

Lisa Goodman-Helfand wears makeup wherever she goes, as she suffers a debilitating disease that causes the skin and connective tissues to harden – Scleroderma.

She routinely wears three layers of foundation to conceal the red and purple spots on her face.

“I religiously apply three layers of concealer to my face every morning before I let the world (beyond my family) see me. Sure, I may look like I’m caking on my makeup with a butter knife, but that beats the alternative; watching everyone I meet recoil in fear of catching some horrible rash, which really isn’t a rash at all,” she wrote in an article on XOJane in May.

She is a teacher and has been blogging about her experience with the disease on her website, Comfortable In My Thick Skin.

She decided to help raise awareness for the disease and the different ways in manifests in sufferers.

Chanel White, a fellow sufferer, has the disease internally, making her organs harden, and has a spot-free face.

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Lisa used a photo of Chanel, and her own makeup free selfie as the cover image for her article for Facebook, only to have it rejected…

“Your ad wasn’t approved because it includes ‘before and after’ images, or other images showing unexpected or unlikely results. It’s also recommended that you avoid focusing on specific body parts, because these images typically receive high negative feedback.”

She wrote back:

“My ad is to spread awareness for a rare autoimmune disease; scleroderma. These two pictures represent the different ways that scleroderma impacts patients. I ask that someone in your department please read the article and explain why it was not approved. This is not a “before and after” type ad. It is a serious article on a serious disease. Thank you.”

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They still misunderstood: 

“I’ve taken a look at your ads and see that we weren’t able to accept them because of the image used. Please note that we don’t allow images that promote an ideal body/physical image (i.e. before and after images). If you’d like to create new ads, please make sure to choose an image that complies with all guidelines.”

After a Yahoo article was published, Facebook apologised, and re-reviewed her ad and approved it – only to have it rejected again.

So Lisa gave up, and launched an event for Scleroderma sufferers, with thousands using the #sclerodermaselfies hashtag.

We guess you don’t need Facebook to make a difference…

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